August 21, 2017 Total Solar Eclipse

Equipment

  • Panasonic GH2 with 45-200 zoom
  • SolarLite ND5 filter sheet
  • JJC intervalometer
  • Lilliput 7" external display

Photos

The setup on the side of a sandy Nebraska Sandhills road [11:26AM MDT]
10 miles SSE of AGATE, NE

Close shot of the setup [11:25AM MDT]

Partial eclipse phase with sunspots visible [11:23AM MDT]

"Baily’s Beads" through filter [11:48AM MDT]

 

Solar eclipse totality [11:49AM MDT]

This photo captures a huge range of light in a single composite image. That's 17.3 stops of dynamic from multiple exposures - or a contrast ratio of 160,000:1 - enough to capture a corona "wingspan" of over 2 million miles. Also captured is illumination of the moon's surface by light reflected from Earth - called "earthshine". The eclipsed sun is flanked by two other visible stars: Regulus on the left, Nu Leonis on the right.

Solar prominences [11:49AM MDT]

"Baily’s Beads" and the sun's red chromosphere [11:50AM MDT]

End of totality: The diamond ring effect [11:50AM MDT]

 
 

Chase Stats

2004-05-24 - 2018-06-06
Chases:
Busts*:
Tornadoes:
Tornado days:
Severe Hail:
Severe Wind:
Active Hours*:
Miles:
108
38
39
23
8
7
916
46,214
see more stats

SPC Outlook

spc outlook day 1
spc outlook day 2
spc outlook day 3
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Aurora Monitor

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